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Category Archives: Concurrent Issues

Two Issues: Tihar Jail’s Misadministration –&– Legitimacy of Death Sentence

It seems better to start by letting the audiences of this post know that, this write up is  neither going to focus on Delhi Moving Bus Gang rape Issue nor on Progress made in the case, though it deals with the death of one of the accused of Delhi Moving Bus Gang rape . The focus here is on administration of Tihar Jail. The write up then turns towards another aspect of issue, which is the demand by some of activists to government and judiciary of country the rape convicts should be condemned and executed. The write up simply raises the issue that can execution be any kind of punishment. It is normal understanding that when one talks of punishment, then in the process of punishment the individual being punished, does not lose his life from the very to the very end of the process. Such punishment where an individual has to lose his life is also against the very spirit of the Constitution of Indian Republic that provides Right to Life as Fundamental Right of any individual.

 The people from media, and through them others, were aware that all accused in case were on suicide watch and such prisoners are never left alone. In such a scenario how can one of the accused (Ram Singh) commit suicide without being noticed by Jail Administration or even his three cell mates? This is a question of administration and security inside India’s fortress-like Tihar Jail, the nation’s largest such facility.

 Can the mysterious death of Delhi gang-rape prime accused be taken at face value? It is an unbelievable suicide case, if taken on face value, as this requires the person committing suicide to possess gymnastic dexterity and phantom-like stealth. Even if one is ready to buy this story, then what are circumstances due to which, the rest four accused of infamous Delhi rape case when produced in front of fast track court (which is listening case), pleaded with folded hands said ‘Shoot us, but don’t send us back there’(Source). This aspect again stops the people from buying the story as narrated Prison staff.  .

This makes it necessary for the people, living outside the Tihar Jail, to learn what transpires inside the Tihar Jail, or to say how the inmates are dealt with inside the Tihar Jail. The other important issue is that how the jail administration communicates of incidents happening inside, while addressing/ informing the people living outside the Tihar Jail.

 The suicide (murder) by (of) accuse Ram Singh occurred despite of the fact that, two months ago, Delhi Police allegedly intercepted calls from a Tihar Jail inmate, who was illegally using the phone of a jail employee. In one conversation the inmate, say sources, hinted that there could be an attack on the five men accused of brutally gang-raping a medical student on a bus in Delhi. Sources said that in the conversation allegedly intercepted by the police, the inmate indicated that the rape accused could be attacked while on their way to the Saket fast track court for daily hearings. Tihar jail officials were reportedly briefed about this specific threat and security for the five men was increased. Lately, about 20 to 30 gun-toting policemen would escort them to the court and inside it. The Tihar Jail authorities are yet to submit a preliminary report on Ram Singh’s death, the circumstances of which have raised many questions (Source).

To get an understanding of what transpires inside Tihar Jail, you need to talk to someone who has stayed there for considerable time. The best would be the individual who has stayed in Tihar as under trail. Probably a serious will to learn the situation inside made one of the correspondents (Mr. Vicky Nanjappa) (Source) to have some dialogues with Professor S. A. R. Geelani (who spent several years in Tihar Jail). S A R Geelani, a Delhi University Professor who was acquitted in the 2001 Parliament attack case, spent a considerable amount of time in Tihar.

 FIRST ISSUE – THE ADMINISTRATION IN SIDE TIHAR JAIL

It all started with mysterious death of Ram Singh, the prime accused in the December 16, 2012 Delhi gang-rape case, inside Tihar Jail on Monday has raised doubts about security at the high-profile prison.

 Professor S. A. R. Geelani’s first person account of an inmate’s life inside Tihar Jail:

 The moment you enter this prison, you feel as though you are going back to the 13th century.

Based on what I have heard of other jails and when I compare that to my own experience in Tihar Jail, this prison appears to be the worst in the country.

The problem begins with the authorities. The prisoners are made to feel like slaves and each one is at the mercy of the authorities. I assure you that no untoward incident can ever take place inside Tihar without the knowledge of at least one jail staff member.

The other thing I noticed was the differential treatment among prisoners. If you are an ordinary citizen, you can expect the worst. But if you are well-connected politically or have a lot of money, then you can buy your way through to comforts. I have seen several well-connected people get their way easily in Tihar.

It is hard to believe the kind of gang wars that take place there. Very often, members of rival gangs are lodged in the same cell. Very often, the authorities turn a blind eye to fights between gangs, which is quite a disgusting sight. I have witnessed it several times.

 Security in Tihar is tight. Each prisoner is under constant watch. The militants are imprisoned in high-security areas and there is not much communication with them. Their cells are very well guarded. There is ample security for the other inmates as well, and that is why I say nothing untoward can happen without the knowledge of the authorities.

There also exists a communal sentiment inside Tihar Jail. It can get communally charged at times. In my observation, it is the jail authorities who ignite such feelings. I find it hard to believe that Ram Singh hanged himself. He was under suicide watch and such prisoners are not left alone, even for a moment. It is therefore impossible for him to have committed suicide. I also fail to understand how Singh could have hung himself from the ceiling. Every cell in Tihar has a very high ceiling and it is impossible to reach it.

 Let us assume that he managed to reach the ceiling with great difficulty. There would have been a lot of noise and this would have drawn the attention of the authorities. There were three other inmates with him in that cell. I am sure he could not have killed himself without waking up them up.

 Observations

 Some of the inferences that can be deduced from the first person account provide above, is that this suicide makes an issue for serious thinking and dialogue. It is courts who send people to jail for keeping law and order situation under control outside the Jail. Inside the jails, it’s assumed that due to availability of law and order enforcing personnel, i.e., people of Police Services, people inside the jail would not have to suffer violation of law and order in any way and their fundamental rights would be ensured.

Somehow, if the scenario is same as told by S A R Geelani, then Hon’ble Judges delivering the judgments need to think thrice, before sentencing anyone to Jail. It’s further expected that the Courts of Law take a serious note of such an issue, i.e., loss of life occurring inside Jail of an inmate, not condemned by law after following full procedure. Even if the jail inmate has been condemned by the courts, then too till the time individual is alive should be permitted to live in a dignified manner and should also be permitted to take recourse to all the legal options available there forth. When and as all the options available have been exhausted and individual has not been provided any relief by any of them, then too, only the legal process as described in the Jail manual should be for execute the condemned person.

 SECOND ISSUE – VALIDITY OF DEATH SENTENCE AS PUNISHMENT

The author in his personal opinion does not favor the provisions of capital punishment. If an individual has committed any crime leading to loss of life of any member of the society, and as a punishment hangs him, then probably there is no difference between that individual and the society. This is being argued for the reasons that if death happens to be one of the forms of punishment, the individual, who has been sentenced to death, may also have executed an individual with the intention of punishing him for his deeds, meaning thereby, that individual too had followed the same process as has been followed by the society. Now who will hang the society or the individuals who ordered and committed the execution, and even if any authority can get this done, then where this process will end?

 If any individual argues that such a provision works as deterrent for people who think of repeating those kinds of heinous acts, then too, I do not find any sanity in this argument and request to authorities that such individuals be lodged in reform homes under careful supervision of specialists.

 Loss of life has neither worked nor will ever work as deterrent to anyone except cowards. Let me put two extreme but non – related observations:

1. If loss of life would have worked as deterrent, then you would have got none to join the armed forces of nation. As securing the nation and advancing in enemy territory, both are expected to start with sacrificing the life. This means there exist motives and emotions which makes an individual feel that achieving the objective being pursued by him/ her is many times valuable than his own life. Or can I expect that someone will offer a different reason for individuals turning them into Fedayeen’s (living and moving Human Bomb)?

 2. If the execution of a condemned person works as deterrent for people who think of repeating those kinds of heinous acts, then probably after execution of Mr. Nathuram Godse, for his act of killing Mr. Gandhi, there would not had occurred any incident involving the assignations of top political leaders in the country. Somehow such acts have only increased in number as can be seen in the cases of Mrs. Indira Gandhi, Mr. Rajiv Gandhi, Mr Baint Singh and some more political personalities.

 I am halting this deliberation here, and if required, may proceed further. Till then happy reading and Good Luck,

                                                                                                      ——————–Always Yours, as Usual — Saurabh Singh

India and Italy – Taking a New Shape

Italian foreign ministry’s announcement on Monday, March 11, 2013, that the two individuals belonging to its marine corps (Massimiliano Latorre and Salvatore Girone, who had shot dead two unarmed Indian Fishermen in Cold – Blood perhaps for adventure  and were facing trail in India Court on the Charges of Murder) would not return to India once their leave expires in view of a “formal international controversy” between the two countries. This is a response to a humane and goodwill gesture shown by Indian Court, which permitted them a leave so that they can go to their country to cast their vote. Indian court had at an earlier occasion permitted the duo to visit their home for Christmas Celebration, after availing which they reported back.

Italian Government and its citizen have always been found grossly lacking in integrity and morality. This can be inferred from a  number of instance where Indian authorities were deceived and cheated by them. If one starts from issues, that probably one that could be easily recalled by masses, one can start with role of Italian businessman Ottavio Quattrocchi during Bofors gun contract in 1990  where kickbacks were paid to earn the contract, the same was followed by a recent deal in which Chief Executive and Chairman Giuseppe Orsi of Italian defence group Finmeccanica has been found to have paid kickbacks worth $68 million to secure the contract for the sale of 12 Agusta Westland choppers to India in 2010.  This has been followed by a very serious breach of integrity by act of Government of Italy, where the government of Italy has back tracked from its own guarantee or promise that it made to Indian Supreme Court in present case where its two mariners were being tried for murder committed by them of two unarmed Indian fishermen in coastal waters of India.

Probably – Indian authorities and Public too, would have learned till now that any and every kind of interaction with Italy has, irrespective of being business or political has caused a great deal of embarrassment to the country. So why do they repeat it? Italian Government and Citizens (as Government represents them) both lack seriously on the scale of integrity. Such country needs be socially politically and economically outcast by world community. One can understand when Terror Groups back track on their promise, but here this Country is behaving worse than terrorists. Now I comprehend why Roman Empire got lost into oblivion. I expect that Consequences as told prime minister will turn visible both to Indian Citizen as well as International Community. “Our government has insisted that Italian authorities… respect the undertaking they have given to the Supreme Court and return the two accused persons to stand trial in India,” Mr. Singh said in Parliament on Wednesday. “If they do not keep their word, there will be consequences for our relations with Italy,” he added, as lawmakers cheered.

At some points I feel that Indian Constitution by the way of providing Three Pillars for having Check and Balance over each other’s powers was really a very well thought of work, at least till time Indira Gandhi had not succeeded in snatching all the powers of decision making from The President of India or to say before turning the office in just a rubber stamp which needs to be put on legislation to accord them status of being Act. But then it were, the citizens, who permitted her to do this by giving her a majority of more than two – third.

Now as a consequence of legislature being fragment it’s the Judiciary that has got some breather to act in an independent manner. They are luckily not failing in their duty and are showing the courage to let the national and international community learn that it’s the constitution that is supreme in India and promises made by any authority are meant to be kept and not broken, meaning thereby that breach will not be tolerated.

The Supreme Court of India sought to restrain Italy’s ambassador from leaving the country in response to Rome’s declaration that two Italian marines will not return to India to stand trial on murder charges. The pair are accused of shooting and killing two Indian fishermen off the coastal state Kerala last year. They deny they committed murder. Italy and India disagree over where they should stand trial, an issue that has triggered a diplomatic dispute and polarized public opinion in both countries

In January, India’s Supreme Court said the two men, Massimiliano Latorre and Salvatore Girone, will face trial in a special court in Delhi. A month later, the court agreed to an Italian government request to allow the two men to leave India and travel to Italy for four weeks to vote in elections. At the time, Mr. Mancini, the Italian ambassador to New Delhi, guaranteed to the court the marines would come back to India.

In a notice, the court said Italian Ambassador Daniele Mancini is not allowed to leave India without its permission, said India’s attorney general, Goolam E. Vahanvati, in an interview. Some individuals doubt the court’s move to be compatible with the terms of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, an international treaty that grants diplomats immunity from criminal, civil and administrative jurisdiction in the country that hosts them.

But the case here is very different. It is Mr. Daniele Mancini (who somehow happens to be Italian Ambassador to India) who stood in court as Guarantee to the court regarding the marines returning back to India after casting their votes. There court has asked Mr. Daniele Mancini to stay put in country till mariners do not return to stand the trail as he stood the guarantee. Court never wants’ the Italian Ambassador to India stay put. But certainly court is not interested in allowing Mr. Daniele Mancini to use his position of being Italian Ambassador to India to work as camouflage in escaping from his promise by forwarding the Vienna Convention in his defense. In fact there is no need to be worried about Vienna Agreement as Italy has itself by its act of not standing to promise made has violated more than a single international pact. If Indian Government feels like, it has all the freedom to launch a military offensive on Italy, as India needs to make sure that in and around Asian continent, rogue states and elements do not dare to raise their heads. Though I am not recommending a military action on Italy, here I am just talking about the rights of India to deal with a Rouge Government or a Government which fails in keeping its promise

Any way Diplomatic immunity is for crimes punishable with fine like parking, not for crimes punishable with jail terms. So there is no diplomatic immunity for the Italian ambassador in the Italian marine bail application. By subjecting himself to the Indian court jurisdiction Mr. Ambassador loses his stand as ambassador and has a role only as a foreign citizen.

                                                                                                                  ————— Always Yours — As Usual — Saurabh Singh

Source:[Website]

Venezuela in transition: What Next after Hugo Chavez

“Chavismo” – Its Meaning and Interpretation

During the fourteen years of Hugo Chavez’s Presidency, Valenzuela was country driven by his personality more than his policies. This gave birth to a term called “Chavismo”, normally used by political commentators and contemporary historians.

In attempt to describe the meaning contained in word “Chavismo”, I would say that Chavismo didn’t encompass the political machine alone , but also a leftist ideology that, prioritized the redistribution of oil wealth to the marginalized and valued, sovereignty as something to be protected from “imperialist” powers.

Now which path will “Chavismo'” will tread can not be predicted with certainty. This is not for the first time that a powerful leader has departed. History of serious geographies are full the incidents in history. As per the testimony of History, it can be inferred, that as many other powerful leaders who departed creating a vacuum have seen their ideologies live on, though not without change.

Professor Javier Corrales, a professor of political science at Amherst College who studies Venezuela expresses his opinion with words as in quotes ahead “there is a trade-off between the degree to which a government centers, on one person, and the strength of that country’s institutions. ” Perhaps due to it being a complete sum, i.e., one, the stronger the central figure will turn, the weaker will be the fortunes of institution. It has been observed over the years, in history of nations, that any society or nation lands in crisis if it were being ruled (or governed) more by the personality of the leader than his policies and ideologies.

Hugo Chavez, a democratically elected, had to face the accusation of being authoritarianism, as his style of governance made his opponents feel that he is attempting to consolidate all the power in the presidency.

Hugo Chavez’s transformation into Everlasting Personality

The world has seen many able and honest administrations and rulers (some elected democratically, some princely in origin, some who took power with coercion, and many more of the kind ), but not all of them achieve a status of hero or legend. Such leaders are rare, but once they are there, the people do not let them go in their life time. This is irrespective of the policies adopted by such rulers.

Policies of such leader may not stand the test time, economy, prudence and other such words; despite of this such leaders have longer reigns (tenure) as compared to rulers whose policies may best fit the tests mentioned at the start of this sentence.

Perhaps, it were one of his most criticized policy by economists, who went even to the level of dubbing it as unsustainable, that earned him the status of Hero and further metamorphosed in what is now known as “Chavismo”.

It was Chavez’s dedication to putting the nation’s poor at the forefront of his policies, which made him a hero among a large sector of the population. His opponents criticized him for his freewheeling spending of oil wealth of the nations, but Venezuela’s poor saw results and elevated Chavez to hero status.

Millions of poor saw and found hope in Hugo Chavez, as they believed that this man can make earn a decent life. This hope and expectation of million of people of Venezuela is looking into the void that has resulted due to departure of their most cherished leader.

The issue haunting the ruling class, opposition and others in Venezuela most is: 1) that who will appropriate his image, 2) how his image can be used beneficially. Probably it seems that the Venezuela’s opposition may attempt to retain some aspects of legacy that has been left by Chavez and claim it to be their own. This inference is being drawn based the way opposition designed it’s last year’s electoral campaign where they promised that social missions initiated by Hugo Chavez will not be undone, they will just be fine tuned to make them more efficient and effective.

One can also deduce the same if (s)he has monitored or followed the tweets from Luis Vicente Leon, Director, Daranalisi (a polling firm). He too predicted similar thing in his tweets even prior to Hugo Chavez’s Death.

Such status, specially in Latin America means a lot. It is something that never disappears with the person who has earned such status but lasts much longer due to the weight it carries. Often it has been seen that politicians normally manipulate memories of such individual leaders, to serve their political purposes and benefits, and same may turn out the fate of Hugo Chavez too in very near future. What ever may be the fate of legacy earned and left behind by Hugo Chavez, but his memory would be a lasting one in the hearts and minds of people of Venezuela.

Two other individuals (leaders) who earned such Status in Latin America. though are no more but they are still present in the memories of people and also in expressed ideologies of some political parties (may be for their own political benefit than anything else).

Sandinismo: Augusto Sandino was the leader of a rebellion in the late 1920s and early 1930s against an American occupation. Years after Sandino was killed, Nicaraguans used his image as a symbol in their own rebellion to overthrow a dictatorship. A movement, the Sandinista National Liberation Front, was born. The current Sandinista president uses the same symbol and movement, though it has been manipulated from earlier Sandinismo.The Sandinistas are in power even today in Nicaragua, under President Daniel Ortega, though the movement has little to do with its origins. it can be inferred that this movement in Nicaragua has survived over the years and is still in vogue.

Peronism: Peronism is a movement named after Argentine President Juan Peron. Juan Peron was one of Former Presidents of Argentine. His legacy has been claimed and manipulated over the years by parties both on the political right and left.

Fidel Castro: Change in Cuba was more subtle after the passing of the torch from Fidel Castro to his brother Raul Castro. The Castros share their communist views, but after the younger Castro took office, he purged some men and has since pursued policies to somewhat open up Cuba.

It seems that in the Popularity of Hugo Chavez combined with the outpouring of tributes in the wake of his death, make a Chavista victory likely in the new elections that must be called. Maduro was named by Chavez as his preferred successor and could easily win the election, but he will have to put the movement’s unity as his priority.

There are divisions within Chavismo that have come to light as Chavez’s health faded. Some stand behind Maduro, who is close with the Cuban regime, while others side with Diosdado Cabello, the National Assembly president who is more of a nationalist. Because Chavez was never sworn in for his latest terms, there is even a debate Maduroover which of the two, constitutionally, should be the interim president.

Indian Presence at the State Funeral of Hugo Chavez: India was represented by Mr. Sachin Pilot, Union Corporate Affairs Minister at Caracas.

Probably this too is one of things that make world go round………….

                                                                                                                      ————— Always Yours — As Usual — Saurabh Singh

Source: ViewsNext.Com

One Percent versus Ninety Nine Percent: A Debate

INDIA DOESN’T NEED FDI IN RETAIL TO GROW — Joseph Stiglitz

Nobel Laureate of 2001 in Economic Joseph Stiglitz (who shared it with two more), presently Professor at University of Columbia, is  credited with starting the “1% versus 99%” debate. The Columbia University professor talks about his latest book, “The Price of Inequality”, in which he argues that economic inequality leads to instability

• The title of the book reflects a view that counters the right-wing argument that inequality may be a bad thing but to do anything about inequality is to kill the goose that lays golden eggs. Inequality is bad for economy, democracy and society. Much of the inequality in the US arises out of rent-seeking —monopoly, exploitive practices by banks and corporate exploitation of public resources. In the Indian context, you will call it corruption but we call it corruption American style, where you give away natural resources below market prices. India is doing it now but America has a long history of doing this.

There is a clear association between inequality and instability. People at the top don’t spend too much, they save a lot but people at the bottom spend everything. So you redistribute income from the bottom to the top and demand goes down. That makes an economy weak. That is what happened in the US. We would have had a weaker economy, but the Feds stepped in by creating a bubble that created more demand to offset the demand that was going down. Of course, creating a bubble was creating instability.

• Stiglitz confessed that both the IMF and the UN commission that I chaired came to the conclusion that inequality was one of the major causes for the crisis. It is not the direct, precipitating cause that bad lending was, but bad lending was a result of deregulation and the interest rates that were itself a result of inequality. If we don’t improve inequality and don’t do something else, it is going to be hard to get back to robust growth and prosperity. We are likely to have another housing bubble.

• He further opines, that in the presidential debates none of the candidates have mentioned the word ‘inequality’ as American politics is money-intensive and money-driven. Each of the candidates is expected to spend a billion dollars. When you spend so much, you have to go where the money is, and money in America is at the top. Therefore it is not a surprise that in the campaign you don’t hear a lot of discussion about inequality and the 1%. You don’t bite the hand that is feeding you in the middle of an election.

• He say that this debate may last or  may remain a phrase, he is not sure of, but it will be a part of America unless the problem of inequality gets addressed. It is just not that the top 1% get three to four times more that what they got in the 1980s, but the middle class today is worse off. When you have this degree of stagnation in the middle, there will be an expression through the political process.

• Stiglitz feels that GDP is not a real measure (or say per capita income) of development. he says that, I haven’t looked at India exactly, but it has strong implication for every country. In the case of China, if you take into account the environmental degradation and resource depletion, growth is much less than what it seems. You need that debate in India. Your GDP is going up, you have per capita highest number of billionaires but at the same time you have many people in poverty. So the GDP per capita doesn’t capture what is happening. In India, the progress in the middle and at the bottom has been less than what GDP in itself would like you to believe.

• When asked about the current issue in Indian Economy, that is FDI in retail, he puts it this way.  The advocates of FDI have probably put too much emphasis on it. India is in a different position than a small, developing country. You have a large pool of entrepreneurs. They are globally savvy, have access to global technology and they have a lot of wealth. So, if there were large returns to large-scale supermarkets, the domestic industry would have supplied it. Not having access to FDI is not an impediment in India. Wal-Mart is able to procure many goods at lower prices than others because of the huge buying power they have and will use that power to bring Chinese goods to India to displace Indian production. So the worry is not so much about the displacement of the small retail store but displacement further down the supply chain.

When an argument that ‘But big chains may create more jobs’; he told that  some of the profits of companies like Wal-Mart come from free riding on our society. They don’t provide healthcare benefits and assume that the spouses of the workers get healthcare benefits from their other employees or through some other mechanism. They might not be a good employer.

Always Yours — As Usual —- Saurabh Singh

Source: TOI

Probably Character and Integrity of Committee and it’s Members is Reflected in Decisions Made by It

Every one probably learns from the very childhood that actions speak louder than words and man is known by the company he keeps. The decisions, made by a committee, in context of previous sentence, should represent the character and integrity of the members of the committee. The two decisions made by a committee are provided here under, which will clearly let anyone understand that, what the main criterion behind such decision was. The Committee that took this decision is as detailed ahead:

The search-cum-selection committee was headed by HRD Minister Mr. Kapil Sibal and consists of chairpersons of UGC; AICTE; Mr. Shiv Nadar, chairperson of IIT Kharagpur, and Mr. Kris Gopalakrishnan of Infosys as members

(1)Choices of panel headed by Kapil Sibbal for Selecting Directors of IITs have already caused an embarrassment to ministry when the panel selected AK Bhowmick, for heading IIT Patna, as his name was not cleared by vigilance cell due to him being indicted by the CBI in the coal net scam.

(2)This time also, this panel has selected PP Chakrabarti as its first choice for heading the IIT Kharagpur. It’s known to all that CBI had recommended penalty against him in the coal net scam and even the CAG had pointed out gross violations. Probably it will be another embarrassment for HRD Ministry, if his name is not cleared again by vigilance.

Now you can decide on character and integrity of the committee members, as I have nothing to say further.

Always Yours — As Usual – Saurabh Singh

Source: Times of India & Indian Education Review

RETIREMENT AGE DE-LINKED FROM SIXTH PAY COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION GIVEN BY UGC

In yet another move to keep states happy about their autonomous status, the Center on Thursday is likely to clear the proposal of allowing them to decide on fixing the retirement age (maximum 65 years) of lecturers in colleges and universities run by state governments. Earlier, the UPA was insistent that states should enhance the lecturers’ retirement to 65 years to enable them to get 80% of the arrears burden of state governments. The arrears — at least Rs 9,000 crore —went up since the Center had asked the states in 2008 to follow the Sixth Pay Commission scales that centrally- funded institutes introduced in the same year, with retrospective effect from January 1, 2006. The Center had said it would bear 80% of the increased arrears for the first four-year period — between April 1, 2006, and March 31, 2010 — if states followed its order. Now, the government plans to foot this sum only in the form of reimbursements in “two-three” installments. This is likely to benefit around four lakh teachers across the country. The ministry cleared this proposal after a committee of secretaries, headed by cabinet secretary, supported the state governments’ demand. Sources said that there could be political reasons for states to push the need for greater autonomy as far as fixing the retirement age is concerned. “Some states might want to fix 60 or 62 years for retirement so that fresh batch of qualified people can apply for jobs, and this will also increase the scope of promotion for many lecturers,” said a senior government official. The sixth pay package for teachers, based on which the scales of centrally-funded institutes were revised, has a provision that requires increasing the retirement age to 65 years. At present, the retirement age of teachers varies across states – from 58 to 60 years.

————————–Always Yours —-  As Usual —– Saurabh Singh

 

 

 

PARTICIPATORY NOTES OR P-NOTES – A CHAOS; CONFUSION; TREACHERY OR SOME THING ELSE?…..A JOURNEY ….

P – NOTES – AN OVERVIEW

Perhaps, since Mr. Pranab Mukherjee, the present Finance Minister of UPA government (2009 – 2014) has presented his finance bill on March 16, 2012, the Term “P – Notes [Participatory Notes]” has transformed or metamorphosed in an instrument of mass massacre at Indian capital markets. Probably in current era we do not have Black Friday but probably a new kind of day, i.e., P – Note day, though the common term “Black Monday” is associated with these P – Notes. Even a rumor on the issue of GAAR and P – Note is good enough to create an epic blood bath in Indian Capital Markets these days.

The class of investors suffering maximum burnt are ‘the new breed of retail investors’, and I feel this to be the worst impact of the event, as this phenomenon may turn the retail investors chary and scary both. Consequently the flow of money to capital markets may decline significantly, rather it may get once again get diverted to safe heavens, i.e., to nationalized bank in India, out of which majority are in cash plus state. This mean the capital that was meant for capital markets will get locked into banks and simultaneously these banks will have to shell out more amount as interest on these deposits; without getting any returns on them (as there are no borrowers available in market, who may love to pick money from bank in the regime of sky rocketing interest rates).

Participatory notes can be found making it to news headlines every alternate day, but due to all bad reasons. They have been in the root of biggest fall witnessed at capital markets in current era. The apex regulatory bodies of Capital Market and Money Market,, i.e., SEBI and RBI are also making it to the headlines of pink paper these days, as they are found issuing notices and warnings to the parties using this instrument.

The financial analysts and experts dealing in or related to Capital Markets are neither concerned nor worried about this instrument, as Indian Investors do not and cannot use this instrument. At the same time they do not have a say in the issue, as it is the government which is supposed decide the fate of Participatory Notes. The P – Notes come into prominence when the deliberations are regarding or related to Foreign Institutional Investors [FIIs].

But what are Participatory Notes [P – Notes]

This as question is circulating in the conscious or sub-conscious part of mind of every individual or retail investor. They are a confused lot due to probably two reasons. First being that till a few months ago they had neither heard about any such instrument nor had they thought that something unknown may throw all their investments plans hay ware. Whereas, the second reason is their failure to comprehend that why it is they, who are paying the cost for something not known, and why the government and market regulators are working towards saving their interests.

An Attempt to Explain what P-Notes Are:

Just like any other derivative ‘Participatory Notes’ too are simply ‘derivative instruments’ that is used by investors not registered in India or Mauritius to trade in Indian markets

Numerous FIIs, which are neither registered nor they wish to get registered with SEBI, but are interested in getting exposure to Indian Securities, place their orders through brokerage houses that have Mauritius-based FII accounts.

These ‘P-Notes’ are generated as a consequence of the action of brokers who buy or sell securities on behalf of their clients on their proprietary account and as a result of the transaction, issue ‘notes’ in favor of such foreign investors. It is these notes which are called in profession of securities trading as “Participatory Notes”. The brokerage houses then repatriate the dividends and capital gains back to these entities, which are generated as a consequence of such trade. In this case, the broker acts like an exchange: it executes the trade and uses its internal accounts to settle the trade. They keep the investor’s name anonymous.

Somehow, anonymous investors are not liked by the regulators of Capital Markets. The recently out, Lahiri Committee Report, also lays emphasis on participatory notes, its role and functioning.

 Functioning of Participatory Notes Depicted Diagramatically

Exhibit – 1: Functioning of Participatory Notes

P-Notes, down the line exhibit properties of Hedge Funds. Although SEBI, as a regulator had issued KYC (Know Your Client) guidelines, which include that, FIIs must know all the requisites details about their client and be able to furnish the details of the same, as and when demanded or asked by the regulator, to which there should be strict compliance, failing which the regulator may sentence them to very harsh punishments or even capital punishments, as was done by SEBI in case of UBS Securities. SEBI barred UBS Securities from trading in Indian markets on this premise only as they could not succeed in furnish the information regarding their clients. Though, finally SAT reversed the SEBI’s order.

The Bigger Issue

The bigger question needs to address the debate on hedge funds and why regulators like SEBI and RBI are wary of them….. ? That will be another topic of discussion with some other headline. For the time being the deliberations stop here.

Photograph of Author or Compiler of this Post

Author

Always Yours — As Usual — Saurabh Singh

Has the Track been cleared …….for Policy Decisions, A Must for Economic Growth & Development

The counting of ballots and consequent declaration of results of Assembly General Elections 2012 held in five states of India on March 06, 2012 completed an important event in the process of Governance. Simultaneously, it also emphasized the importance of concept of Federalism for modern day democracy. On the other side of these developments, an increasing demand world over could be seen, India included, to incorporate or bring about a transformational change in the context to the ‘Governance’ issue.

It seems to be an apt time for revisiting to ensure that ‘Democracy’ as a system of governance adheres to its core attributes and the ‘Institutions’ erected to ensure its real spirit are capable of not alone performing the task, but also of representing the diversity, culture and socioeconomic issues and facets of the people, who have adopted such a system of governance.

It’s being expected by all concerned, that with culmination of Assembly General Elections 2012 of five states, functioning of Union Government would turn more efficient. Union government may now get free from the clutches of ‘Policy – Paralysis’ or ‘Stymied Decision Making Process’, which seemed to have become integral process of decision making by Union Government in Financial Year 2011 – 2012.    

Numerous issues of urgent importance, which were supposed to have been approved or rejected, are still there in cupboards of ministries, either awaiting their turn for being tabled in parliament, or are there in roll back mode awaiting the creation of elusive ‘consensus’. The post Assembly General Elections 2012 picture may not be pleasant to ruling coalition as Union Government, but it has certainly succeeded in putting an end to chaos, confusion or dilemmas born out of various presumptions and  self-fulfilling interests of a number of political parties.

The words, such as ‘Urgent’, ’Important’, ’Immediate’, ’Today ’and ‘Top Priority’ etc. have turned meaningless when seen in context of number of issues to be tabled, discussed and cleared or rejected by both the houses of Parliament, and also in the context of quantum of delay that has already occurred. Some issues out of them may be put, for purpose of illustration, as ‘FDI in Retail Sector’, ‘Direct Tax Reforms’, ‘Entry of Foreign Equity in Indian Airlines Industry’, ‘Issue of 4G Spectrum’, ‘Issue of Telangana’, ‘Creation of NCTC’, ‘Proposal on RPF’, ‘Issue of Inflation in Food Items’, ‘Deregulation of Prices of Petroleum Products’, ‘Land Leasing Bill or even Land Reforms Bills’, ‘Transforming Education in to Business’ and many more of the similar type.

The comments on issues are knowingly being avoided, as every single issue is important and also a subject matter to be covered in numerous articles, debates and deliberations. Certainly the same will be done, but the purpose here was to highlight the important issues pending approval of the parliament and also the evolution of Indian Political System and Governance as on date.

 

Always Yours —– As Usual —— Saurabh Singh

A Man Who Bestowed Upon You the Power to Hold Globe on Your Palm

A Man Who Bestowed Upon You the Power to Hold Globe on Your Palm

“Three apples have changed the world. One seduced Eve, second awakened Newton, the third one was in the hands of Jobs.”

Much before embarking on the path of giving the world iconic products like Mac computers, iPod music players, iPhone mobile phones and iPad tablet PCs, this cult figure of the world of technology came to India in early 70s in search of enlightenment or ‘nirvana’ and went back unsatisfied.

He found India far poorer than he had imagined at that time and, ironically, years later in mid-2000s, when he thought of setting up a facility for Apple’s Mac computers, India appeared to be much less cost-effective to do business.

But, it was his unsatisfactory India visit of early 70s that could have been one of the major reasons for Jobs’ focus on the world of technology and eventually the setting up of the company called Apple.

His biography, titled ‘The Little Kingdom — The Private Story of Apple Computer’ quotes Jobs as saying that “It was one of the first times that I started to realise that maybe Thomas Edison did a lot more to improve the world than Karl Marx and Neem Kairolie Baba put together.”

Photograph of Steve Jobs

Neem Karori Baba was the guru that Jobs, then 18, visited in India along with his college friend Dan Kottke. The American duo had come to India after they dropped out of college and Kottke eventually joined Jobs as the first employee of Apple.

“The hot, uncomfortable summer made Jobs question many of the illusions he had nursed about India. He found India far poorer than he had imagined and was struck by the incongruity between the country’s condition and its airs of holiness,” author Michael Moritz wrote in Jobs’ biography.

The book quoted Jobs as saying: “We weren’t going to find a place where we could go for a month to be enlightened” and said that by the time he returned to California “he was thinner, thanks to a bout of dysentery, had closely cropped hair, and was dressed in an Indian attire…”

Years later in 2006, there were talks about Apple mulling over a 3,000-strong workforce centre in Bangalore to support its Mac and other products and it was said that the company even hired an initial team of 30 people. But, the plans did not fructify and reports said that the company did not find India as cost-effective as it had thought it to be.

Ironically, Jobs died on a day when Indian government unveiled its own answer to iPad, with a price tag much lower than that of the iconic brand, in the form of Aakash, the world’s cheapest tablet PC.

Apple on Wednesday announced the death of its visionary co-founder Steve Jobs.

“We are deeply saddened to announce that Steve Jobs passed away today,” the company’s board of directors said in a statement.

Steve’s brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives. The world is immeasurably better because of Steve.”

The Silicon Valley icon who gave the world the iPod and the iPhone resigned as CEO of the world’s largest technology corporation in August, handing the reins to current chief executive Tim Cook.

Jobs had battled cancer in 2004 and underwent a liver transplant in 2009 after taking a leave of absence for unspecified health problems. He took another leave of absence in January, his third since his health problems began, before resigning as CEO six weeks ago. Jobs became Apple’s chairman and handed the CEO job over to his hand-picked successor, Tim Cook.

The news Apple fans and shareholders had been dreading came the day after Apple unveiled its latest version of the iPhone, just one in a procession of devices that shaped technology and society while Jobs was running the company.

Jobs started Apple with a high school friend in a Silicon Valley garage in 1976, was forced out a decade later and returned in 1997 to rescue the company. During his second stint, it grew into the most valuable technology company in the world with a market value of $351 billion. Only Exxon Mobil, which makes it money extracting and refining oil instead of ideas, is worth more.

Cultivating Apple’s countercultural sensibility and a minimalist design ethic, Jobs rolled out one sensational product after another, even in the face of the late-2000s recession and his own failing health.

He helped change computers from a geeky hobbyist’s obsession to a necessity of modern life at work and home, and in the process he upended not just personal technology but the cellphone and music industries. For transformation of American industry, he ranks among his computer-age contemporary, Microsoft Corp. co-founder Bill Gates and other creative geniuses such as Walt Disney that left an indelible imprint on the world. Jobs died as Walt Disney Co.’s largest shareholder, a by-product of his decision to sell computer animation studio Pixar in 2006.

Perhaps most influentially, Jobs in 2001 launched the iPod, which offered “1,000 songs in your pocket.” Over the next 10 years, its white earphones and thumb-dial control seemed to become more ubiquitous than the wristwatch.

In 2007 came the touch-screen iPhone, joined a year later by Apple’s App Store, where developers could sell iPhone “apps” which made the phone a device not just for making calls but also for managing money, editing photos, playing games and social networking. And in 2010 Jobs introduced the iPad, a tablet-sized, all-touch computer, that took off even though market analysts said no one really needed one.

Steven Paul Jobs was born Feb. 24, 1955, to Joanne Simpson, then an unmarried graduate student, and Abdulfattah Jandali, a student from Syria. Simpson gave Jobs up for adoption, though she married Jandali and a few years later had a second child with him, Mona Simpson, who became a novelist.

Steven Paul Jobs was adopted by Clara and Paul Jobs of Los Altos, Calif., a working-class couple who nurtured his early interest in electronics. He saw his first computer terminal at NASA’s Ames Research Center when he was around 11 and landed a summer job at Hewlett-Packard before he had finished high school.

Jobs enrolled in Reed College in Portland, Ore., in 1972 but dropped out after a semester.

“All of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it,” he said at a Stanford University commencement address in 2005. “I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out.”

When he returned to California in 1974, Jobs worked for video game maker Atari and attended meetings of the Homebrew Computer Club with Steve Wozniak, a high school friend who was a few years older.

Wozniak’s homemade computer drew attention from other enthusiasts, but Jobs saw its potential far beyond the geeky hobbyists of the time. The pair started Apple in Jobs’ parents’ garage in 1976. Their first creation was the Apple I – essentially, the guts of a computer without a case, keyboard or monitor.

The Apple II, which hit the market in 1977, was their first machine for the masses. It became so popular that Jobs was worth $100 million by age 25. Time magazine put him on its cover for the first time in 1982.

During a 1979 visit to the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Jobs again spotted mass potential in a niche invention: a computer that allowed people to access files and control programs with the click of a mouse not typed commands. He returned to Apple and ordered the team to copy what he had seen.

It foreshadowed a propensity to take other people’s concepts, improve on them and spin them into wildly successful products. Under Jobs, Apple didn’t invent computers, digital music players or smartphones – it reinvented them for people who didn’t want to learn computer programming or negotiate the technical hassles of keeping their gadgets working.

“We have always been shameless about stealing great ideas,” Jobs said in an interview for the 1996 PBS series “Triumph of the Nerds.”

The engineers responded with two computers. The pricier one, called Lisa, launched to a cool reception in 1983. A less-expensive model called the Macintosh, named for an employee’s favorite apple, exploded onto the scene in 1984.

The Mac was heralded by an epic Super Bowl commercial that referenced George Orwell’s “1984” and captured Apple’s iconoclastic style.

 

In the ad, expressionless drones marched through dark halls to an auditorium where a Big Brother-like figure lectures on a big screen. A woman in a bright track uniform burst into the hall and launched a hammer into the screen, which exploded, stunning the drones, as a narrator announced the arrival of the Mac.”

There were early stumbles at Apple. Jobs clashed with colleagues and even the CEO he had hired away from Pepsi, John Sculley. And after an initial spike, Mac sales slowed, in part because few programs had been written for the new graphical user interface.

Meanwhile, Microsoft copied the Mac approach and introduced Windows, outmaneuvering Apple by licensing its software to slews of computer makers while Apple insisted on making its own machines.

Software developers wrote programs first for Windows because it had millions more computers. A Mac version didn’t come for months, if at all.

With Apple’s stock price sinking, conflicts between Jobs and Sculley mounted. Sculley won over the board in 1985 and pushed Jobs out of his day-to-day role leading the Macintosh team. Jobs resigned his post as chairman of the board and left Apple within months.

“What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating,” Jobs said in his Stanford speech. “I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.”

He got into two other companies: Next, a computer maker, and Pixar, a computer-animation studio that he bought from George Lucas for $10 million.

Pixar, ultimately the more successful venture, seemed at first a bottomless money pit. Then came “Toy Story,” the first computer-animated full-length feature. Jobs used its success to negotiate a sweeter deal with Disney for Pixar’s next two films. In 2006, Jobs sold Pixar to The Walt Disney Co. for $7.4 billion in stock, making him Disney’s largest individual shareholder and securing a seat on the board.

With Next, Jobs was said to be obsessive about the tiniest details of the cube-shaped computer, insisting on design perfection even for the machine’s guts. He never managed to spark much demand for the machine, which cost a pricey $6,500 to $10,000.

Ultimately, he shifted the focus to software – a move that paid off later when Apple bought Next for its operating system technology, the basis for the software still used in Mac computers.

By 1996, when Apple bought Next, Apple was in dire financial straits. It had lost more than $800 million in a year, dragged its heels in licensing Mac software for other computers and surrendered most of its market share to PCs that ran Windows.

Larry Ellison, Jobs’ close friend and fellow Silicon Valley billionaire and the leader of Oracle Corp., publicly contemplated buying Apple in early 1997 and ousting its leadership. The idea fizzled, but Jobs stepped in as interim chief later that year.

He slashed unprofitable projects, narrowed the company’s focus and presided over a new marketing push to set the Mac apart from Windows, starting with a campaign encouraging computer user to “Think different.”

“In the early days, he was in charge of every detail. The only way you could say it is, he was kind of a control freak,” he said. In his second stint, “he clearly was much more mellow and more mature.”

In the decade that followed, Jobs kept Apple profitable while pushing out an impressive roster of new products.

Apple’s popularity exploded in the 2000s. The iPod, smaller and sleeker with each generation, introduced many lifelong Windows users to their first Apple gadget.

ITunes, in 20XX, gave people a convenient way to buy music legally online, song by song. For the music industry, it was a mixed blessing. The industry got a way to reach Internet-savvy people who, in the age of Napster, were growing accustomed to downloading music free. But online sales also hastened the demise of CDs and established Apple as a gatekeeper, resulting in battles between Jobs and music executives over pricing and other issues.

Jobs’ command over gadget lovers and pop culture swelled to the point that, on the eve of the iPhone’s launch in 2007, faithful followers slept on sidewalks outside posh Apple stores for the chance to buy one. Three years later, at the iPad’s debut, the lines snaked around blocks and out through parking lots, even though people had the option to order one in advance.

The decade was not without its glitches. Apple was swept up in a Securities and Exchange Commission inquiry into stock-options backdating in the mid-2000s, a practice that artificially boosted the value of options grants. But Jobs and Apple emerged unscathed after two former executives took the fall and eventually settled with the SEC.

Jobs’ personal ethos – a natural food lover who embraced Buddhism and New Age philosophy – was closely linked to the public persona he shaped for Apple. Apple itself became a statement against the commoditization of technology – a cynical view, to be sure, from a company whose computers can cost three or more times as much as those of its rivals.

For technology lovers, buying Apple products meant gaining entrance to an exclusive club. At the top was a complicated and contradictory figure who was endlessly fascinating – even to his detractors, of which Jobs had many. Jobs was a hero to techno-geeks and a villain to partners he bullied and to workers whose projects he unceremoniously killed or claimed as his own.

Unauthorized biographer Alan Deutschman described him as “deeply moody and maddeningly erratic.” In his personal life, Jobs denied for two years that he was the father of Lisa, the baby born to his longtime girlfriend Chrisann Brennan in 1978.

Few seemed immune to Jobs’ charisma and will. He could adeptly convince those in his presence of just about anything – even if they disagreed again when he left the room and his magic wore off.

“He always has an aura around his persona,” said Bajarin, who met Jobs several times while covering the company for more than 20 years as a Creative Strategies analyst. “When you talk to him, you know you’re really talking to a brilliant mind.”

But Bajarin also remembers Jobs lashing out with profanity at an employee who interrupted their meeting. Jobs, the perfectionist, demanded greatness from everyone at Apple.

Jobs valued his privacy, but some details of his romantic and family life have been uncovered. In the early 1980s, Jobs dated the folk singer Joan Baez, according to Deutschman.

In 1989, Jobs spoke at Stanford’s graduate business school and met his wife, Laurene Powell, who was then a student. When she became pregnant, Jobs at first refused to marry her. It was a near-repeat of what had happened more than a decade earlier with then-girlfriend Brennan, Deutschman said, but eventually Jobs relented.

Jobs started looking for his biological family in his teens, according to an interview he gave to The New York Times in 1997. He found his biological sister when he was 27. They became friends, and through her Jobs met his biological mother. Few details of their relationships have been made public.

But the extent of Apple secrecy didn’t become clear until Jobs revealed in 2004 that he had been diagnosed with – and “cured” of – a rare form of operable pancreatic cancer called an islet cell neuroendocrine tumor. The company had sat on the news of his diagnosis for nine months while Jobs tried trumping the disease with a special diet, Fortune magazine reported in 2008.

In the years after his cancer was revealed, rumors about Jobs’ health would spark runs on Apple stock as investors worried the company, with no clear succession plan, would fall apart without him. Apple did little to ease those concerns. It kept the state of Jobs’ health a secret for as long as it could, then disclosed vague details when, in early 2009, it became clear he was again ill.

Jobs took a half-year medical leave of absence starting in January 2009, during which he had a liver transplant. Apple did not disclose the procedure at the time; two months later, The Wall Street Journal reported the fact and a doctor at the transplant hospital confirmed it.

In January 2011, Jobs announced another medical leave, his third, with no set duration. He returned to the spotlight briefly in March to personally unveil a second-generation iPad .

In 2005, following the bout with cancer, Jobs delivered Stanford University’s commencement speech.

“Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life,” he said. “Because almost everything – all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important.”

 

 

 

Always Yours —- As Usual  —- Saurabh Singh

Send your comments at  managementteacher@gmail.com

Note: It includes information from numerous sources, and I thankfully acknowledge them as it would have, really been tough to complete this comprehensive information, without their contributions.

 

 

 

 

TIHAR SURRENDERED

ANNA REFUSES TO COME OUT OF TIHAR

Veteran social activist Anna Hazare refused to come out of Tihar jail on Tuesday evening saying he wants an unconditional release and unconditional permission to go ahead with his indefinite fast at Jai Prakash Narayan Park in New Delhi.

Earlier, Delhi Police Commissioner B K Gupta issued a release warrant of Anna and his associates after police decided to withdraw its case against them.

Delhi Police sources said that warrants of release have been sent to Tihar Jail authorities for freeing Hazare and his seven associates who were held this morning ahead of their plans to launch an indefinite strike for a strong Lokpal.

The sources said the decision to release was taken after government is understood to have come to the conclusion that keeping him in jail would create unnecessary law and order situation.

Tihar jail sources said that all the eight had been kept in separate lock ups and would be freed soon. Hazare and his associates had refused to take food during their detention under judicial remand.

Earlier, Anna Hazare was on Tuesday sent to seven days’ judicial custody at Tihar jail after he refused to sign a personal bond and come out on bail following his arrest.

The veteran anti-corruption crusader was sent to jail no. four at Tihar where former Commonwealth Games Organising committee head Suresh Kalmadi has also been lodged.

Hazare, who was arrested in the morning on grounds of apprehension of breach of peace following his intention to defy prohibitory orders to go on indefinite hunger strike, was produced before a special executive magistrate.

‘Hazare refused to give undertaking not to defy Section 144’

Gupta said the police was prepared for his being released on a personal bond if the Gandhian would have given an undertaking that he will not defy Section 144 of the CrPC that prohibits gathering of five or more people and also ask his supporters not to do so.

Sources said since Hazare refused to give an undertaking, the magistrate remanded him to a seven-day judicial custody.

He will be taken to Tihar jail where he will spend time in judicial custody. Three other leading activists of the team Hazare — Kiran Bedi, Arvind Kejriwal and Manoj Sisodia — were also sent to judicial custody on similar grounds.

Nearly 1400 activists were detained in various parts of the city when they came out in support of Hazare, who had planned to launch the fast at J P park near Ferozeshah Kotla and Delhi Police Commissioner B K Gupta said they would be released after “some time”.

Protest march from India Gate to Parliament planned

Meanwhile, hours after the detention of Anna Hazare, his aides on Tuesday vowed to take out a protest march to Parliament House from India Gate on Wednesday in defiance of prohibitory orders clamped in the high-security area as part of a country-wide agitation against the police action.

“A protest march will also take place tomorrow from India Gate to Parliament House,” lawyer Prashant Bhushan, a key member of Hazare’s anti-graft campaign, told mediapersons in New Delhi.

He said protests have been planned across the country to vent their anger “peacefully and in a non-violent” manner against the detention of Hazare and his supporters.

‘There is no freedom for Delhi police’

Alleging that the action against Hazare was taken at the behest of the central government, Bhushan said, “The decision to detain Hazare or to deny permission for his protest were taken by Cabinet ministers. It is not the Delhi police which is taking these decisions. There is no freedom for Delhi police. It has become a puppet, an ornament in the hands of Central government.”

He said students of Delhi University will protest outside Chhatrasal Stadium, which has been turned into a special jail, and court arrest while another protest will be organised at Pragati Maidan from where the activists will take a march to Jai Prakash Narain Park.

Prohibitory orders have already been imposed in the localities mentioned by Bhushan.

Anna shares jail with Kalmadi, Kejriwal with Raja

In a related development, Anna Hazare will share space with A Raja and Suresh Kalmadi both accused in the high-profile scams in Tihar jail.

“Anna Hazare has been lodged in jail number four where Suresh Kalmadi and Kalaignar TV Managing Director Sharad Kumar are lodged,” Deputy Inspector General (Tihar) R N Sharma told PTI in New Delhi.

Anna will be with his associates Rajesh, Suresh Pathare and Manish Sisodia in a cell of the prison which houses 2,231 inmates.

Former Indian Revenue Services officer Arvind Kejriwal has been lodged in jail number one with former Telecom Minister A Raja and MD of D B Realty Shahid Balwa are lodged.

Navin, Dada Thakare and Pathare were accompanying Kejriwal in the cells of this jail which has 1,543 prisoners.

All the eight were brought at 4.15 pm and were quietly sent to their cells.

Always Yors —- As Usual— Saurabh Singh

Source: Rediff

 

 

 

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