Administration & Management

It's Art of Governance & Not Commerce Alone

Tag Archives: Social Sciences

ACADEMICS IS LONG DEAD!———————– LONG LIVE ACADEMICS !!!

I am not aware as to why and how, the team of A “Journal published by Research Directorate of a University well known”, had thought and ultimately sent a research paper submitted to it for consideration of publication, for the purpose of getting referees comments on the same.

This happened to be the first time; I got any assignment of this nature from Journal Publishing Division of the particular university.

Initially, I was surprised by this gesture, due to the traditions that prevail in the nation happens to be selection of reviewers based on designation and is not based on knowledge of domain and expertise of Individual in it. As I happen to be reviewer of many International Journals, being at my designation itself, that Assistant Professor [for people not related to the institution I work with, or those who retired prior to Sixth Pay Commission Recommendations; it is being mentioned that this designation is same, which in their time was known as Lecturer] not being named here for reasons of confidentiality; but never expected it from the published by Research Directorate of a University known well to all. University is not being named for Reasons of Confidentiality.

The manner, in which the role of referee is supposed to be performed, was followed and performed with to the level of and with all possible integrity and devotion to the extent possible and expected within my limitations. The comments that were as final recommendation put by me on the space meant for Comment on the Evaluators’ Sheet were as detailed in double quotes:

“The work completed and outcome of the same happen to be very relevant and pertinent for concerned domain of knowledge. The paper too has been drafted, following most of the conventions in vogue, in research. Evaluator feels that, if some extra efforts can be put and same is fine tuned further, the contribution, by this paper, may achieve a distinction of being seminal in Nature. Therefore, recommends that, the scholar may be provided with a chance of value addition.”

Since, due to the limitations of space provided on Page, provided for comments; was forced to attach three additional A4 Sheets. The same got details explaining the comments given as mentioned paragraph just preceding this one.

Perhaps due to paucity of money in the Organizational Funds, it has turned impossible for the organization to provide me a couple of cartridges, for performing few academic endeavors’. I thought better to buy the same from my pocket [Approx. Five plus Three Units, as only a petty sum of Rs. 32,000/- was required].

Any way then too, I preferred to write comments in ink by my own fountain pen. My purpose of joining academics is not alone to earn money, but certainly let me accept that its important but I have given it second priority. My primary objective is still, to learn as far as possible to turn capable of solving at least one unsolved miseries existing in this enigmatic and ever expanding universe, which can turn helpful in overcoming at least one the suffering from total number of miseries being faced by humanity. Thus I take my salary as stipend received by name “Learn while you Earn”. The salary in material terms is also not more than that, which clear by my designation as mentioned above. The comments, thus, in additional sheets were scribbled in my own hand writing and attached along with evaluator’s report.

Now the logic as to why I am sharing this information with my audience:

“When Paper was returned back to Scholar who had authored the same, for the purpose of correction; it got revealed to me that the authors were none other than Learned Dean of one College of the same well known University co- authored by Learned Head Department of the same College, and a scholar who got admitted to the prestigious degree of Doctor of Philosophy the domain dealt by the college, bearing a seal of the prestigious university”.

Now I feel a bit happy for of my decision of not getting enrolled or registered for Ph. D., in the Particular College and the University.

This also clearly introduces me to the reasons, as to why the university despite of best of its efforts has not got the status of Central University. Probably as of now the University should vie to get recognized as National Institution, even which as per me, may not be awarded.

Finally I Hope that there is no need to Sign this Document….As the above content has not been created for legal purposes. It’s just meant to separate and create a visible difference between a Professor and a Tutor performing the role of Professor to earn his Livelihood. ALSO TO EXPLAIN WHAT IT MEANS AND SHOULD BE EXPECTED BY PRESENT GENERATION INDIVIDUALS DECORATED BY DEGREE TITLED DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY.

ACADEMICS IS LONG DEAD! ………………………………………………

……………………..…………………………………………………………….LONG LIVE ACADEMICS !!!

 

Always Yours ………………………………..As Usual…………………………Saurabh Singh

The Extended Marketing Mix Model

The Extended Marketing Mix Model —  Boom & Bitner’s Additional Three Ps of Marketing Mix

The marketing mix is the combination of marketing activities that an organization engages in so as to best meet the needs of its targeted market. Traditionally the marketing mix consisted of just 4 Ps.


For example, motor vehicle manufacturers like Audi:

  • Produces products that are of the highest quality and fit for the needs of different groups of consumers,
  • Offers a range of cars at value for money prices, depending on the market segmented they are targeted at,
  • Sells the cars through appropriate outlets such as dealerships and showrooms in prime locations, i.e. in the right places, and
  • Supports the marketing of the products through appropriate promotional and advertising activity.

The marketing mix  [McCarthy’s Marketing Mix Model called 4 Ps of Marketing] thus consists of four main elements:

1. Product

2. Price

3. Place

4. Promotion.

Getting the mix of these elements right enables the organisation to meet its marketing objectives and to satisfy the requirements of customers.


In addition to the traditional four Ps it is now customary to add some more Ps to the mix to give us Seven Ps.

The additional Ps have been added because today marketing is far more customer oriented than ever before, and because the service sector of the economy has come to dominate economic activity in this country.

These 3 extra Ps are particularly relevant to this new extended service mix.

THE THREE EXTRA Ps ARE:

1. Physical layout

These days when manufacturing dominated the UK economy the physical layout of production units such as factories was not very important to the end consumer because they never went inside the factory. However, today consumers typically come into contact with products in retail units – and they expect a high level of presentation in modern shops – e.g. record stores, clothes shops etc. Not only do they need to easily find their way around the store, but they also often expect a good standard or presentation.


The importance of quality physical layout is important in a range of service providers, including:

  • Students going to college or university have far higher expectations about the quality of their accommodation and learning environment than in the past. As a result colleges and universities pay far more attention to creating attractive learning environments, student accommodation, shops, bars and other facilities.
  • Air passengers expect attractive and stimulating environments, such as interesting departure lounges, with activities for young children etc.
  • Hair dressing salons are expected to provide pleasant waiting areas, with attractive reading materials, access to coffee for customers, etc.
  • Physical layout is not only relevant to stores, which we visit, but also to the layout and structure of virtual stores, and websites.

2. Provision of customer service

Customer service lies at the heart of modern service industries. Customers are likely to be loyal to organizations that serve them well – from the  way in which a telephone query is handled, to direct face-to-face interactions. Although the ‘have a nice day’ approach is a bit corny, it is certainly better than a couldn’t care less approach to customer relations. Call centre staff and customer interfacing personnel are the front line troops of any organisation and therefore need to be thoroughly familiar with good customer relation’s practice.

3. Processes

Associated with customer service are a number of processes involved in making marketing effective in an  organization e.g. processes for handling customer complaints, processes for identifying customer needs and requirements, processes for handling order etc

The 7 Ps – price, product, place, promotion, physical presence, provision of service, and processes comprise the modern marketing mix that is particularly relevant in service industry, but is also relevant to any form of business where meeting the needs of customers is given priority.

Always Yours—–as Usual——Saurabh Singh

SHGs Performance Compared Based on Mentor Affiliation– New Monograph in Press


The Cover Page of Monograph at The moment in Press is Provided below with all relevant Information.


ISBN: 978-3-639-25488-4

Title: A COMPARATIVE REVIEW OF SHGs’ PERFORMANCE

Sub Title: MENTORED BY GOVERNMENT Vs. NON GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATION

Authors: SAURABH SINGH & Dr. Raj Kamal

Hope you find it to be OK

Always Yours———- as Usual  ———— Saurabh Singh

I Keep Thinking About:

“Why majority of social scientists often try to turn mathematicians, which they are not and neither it’s expected of them…Gentlemen you are expected to have Mastered humanities …society won’t take mathematical equations in exchange…equations will be taken as…adding salt to injury …if you do so…You are the one who destabilized the fine balance of Psycho-Socio-Economic elements of Humanity…we can hire a lot of Mathematics graduates…But Philosophers, Thinkers, Social Scientists are Rare Creations of Almighty…We are Searching them Pan Disciplines identified till Date.”

“Want to keep Yourself Updated about Saurabh’s Every move ! — Then Click The Google Button Just Below. It would do the Job, So Now You can Relax.”

Add to Google

Finance in History

Dear Learned Audiences,

History is not just a forte of Kings, Emperors, Social Workers, Leaders and so on only. It keeps on silently recording the numerous developments happening in the various spheres of learning too. Sometimes, it may be in the form of thought other day it may be principles and following day may be for practices.

Finance in History

If you are doomed to repeat history, let’s hope you can pick your era. Once upon a time, business bankruptcies resulted in jail time (if you were lucky), treasurers defended their funds with a sword, and financial planning was tested by plagues and fire. Things improved during the American Revolution, when the father of our country also proved to be one of its best bookkeepers. But accounting couldn’t keep up during the Industrial Revolution, with disastrous consequences for workers. If you tend to think of history as the third quarter of the last fiscal year, it may be time to learn a little bit more about your profession’s checkered past.

The 17th-century business world revealed in Samuel Pepys’s famous diary is not so far removed from our own.

“Most happy in the keeping of all my accounts, for that after all the changings and turnings necessary in such an account, I find myself right to a farthing in an account of 127,000 pounds.” — Samuel Pepys’s diary entry, August 20, 1666

Public officials in 17th-century England had not yet refined the notion that one has to pay to play; that is, pony up political contributions to obtain government contracts or favors. But when Samuel Pepys was an important naval administrator in London during the mid-1660s, the basic idea was well understood. Like others similarly situated, Pepys gladly accepted gifts, and he recognized the debt he incurred in accepting them.

We know this from reading Pepys’s diary, regarded by many as the greatest in the English language. Between January 1, 1660, and May 31, 1669, Pepys (rhymes with “keeps”) chronicled his everyday life, from his professional concerns to his sexual escapades, from the state of the financial accounts he kept to the painful progress of his kidney stone. The practice of diary keeping began to catch on during the 17th century, according to Pepys biographer Claire Tomalin. But his is prized for its confessional insights, large cast of characters, accounts of significant events, and entertaining narrative, combining to reveal a singular sensibility.

“What is extraordinary is that he went into areas no one else considered recording, looked at himself with as much curiosity as he looked at the exterior world, weighing himself and the world equally in the balance,” observes Tomalin in Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self (2002). Writing for his eyes only, Pepys used a private shorthand and, in especially delicate passages, French. His six-volume diary was only deciphered and published in the 1820s, more than 100 years after his death.

To historians, Pepys was an invaluable chronicler of a period when the press was censored by the government of Charles II. From him we have poignant accounts of the Great Plague, which decimated England in 1665, and of the Great Fire of London, which destroyed half the city in 1666. On a more personal scale, Pepys supplied entertaining accounts of his financial wheelings and dealings as a government administrator.

“The Diary sends a beam of light into the way in which government officers and businessmen worked together, through clubs, through hospitality, through trips that mixed business and pleasure, through well-chosen and discreetly given presents and through cultivating the friendship of those in a position to be helpful in giving contracts or licenses,” observes Tomalin. “The circumstances were different, but there is something eerily familiar about it too: today’s arms and building contracts, entertainment of clients, quiet words at the club, conferences in luxury hotels, boardroom rivalries and contributions to favourite charities are all in the same tradition. Pepys was, among other things, mapping a recognizably modern world.”

Accounting for the Royal Navy

As one learns from the diary, Pepys was ambitious, intelligent, and well connected. Born in 1633, he never became a sailor, but gained an accounting post in the British Navy and turned it to steady profit. Pepys had the good fortune to capitalize on his family’s one political connection: he was a distant cousin to Sir Edward Montagu, later the Earl of Sandwich. Oliver Cromwell put Montagu in joint command of the British fleet, and the 27-year-old Pepys sailed in on Montagu’s coattails. In 1660 Pepys was appointed Clerk of the Acts to the Navy Board, and as such was responsible for requesting funds from Parliament and dispensing them to build the navy and keep it afloat.

Pepys advanced steadily during the next 13 years, eventually becoming Secretary of the Admiralty. Anyone who wanted a government contract to supply the Royal Navy had to go through his office. Shipbuilders, victuallers, slopsellers, and many others did their best to curry favor with the young finance minister.

On August 16, 1660, in the first year of his diary, Pepys recorded a telling conversation he had with Lord Sandwich. Riding across town in a coach, Sandwich told Pepys that he hopes the Clerk of the Acts position will be good to him, saying “it was not the salary of any place that did make a man rich, but the opportunity of getting money while he is in the place.”

Pepys took this advice to heart. Once sworn in as Clerk of the Acts, he almost immediately found himself on the receiving end of a steady stream of gifts, from barrels of oysters, wine, and brandy to gold coins and silver plate. In 17th-century London, merchants clearly considered these donations to be money well spent, just another cost of doing business.

On April 3, 1663, the diarist described a defense used by politicians to this day, which basically consists of sticking to an absurdly literal, and narrow, truth. After a certain Captain Grove gives him a letter that he can tell contains money, Pepys wrote: “But I did not open it till I came home to my office; and there I broke it open, not looking into it till all the money was out, that I might say I saw no money in the paper if ever I should be questioned about it.”

Another business associate gave him “a present for his wife,” a package said to contain a pair of gloves. On the evening of February 2, 1664, Pepys noted: “When I came home, Lord! in what pain I was to get my wife out of the room without bidding her go, that I might see what these gloves were; and by and by, she being gone, it proves a payre of white gloves for her and forty pieces in good gold, which did so cheer my heart that I could eat no victuals almost for dinner for joy to think how God do bless us every day more and more.”

Plague, Fire, and Fortune

Ironically, biographer Tomalin says the plague year of 1665 was one of Pepys’s happiest. During it his fortune quadrupled, thanks in part to two additional appointments: treasurer for Tangier and surveyor-general of victualling for the navy. Meanwhile, as his fortune grew, so did the plague. From June to September, deaths from the disease doubled nearly every week.

“But, Lord! to see how the plague spreads,” wrote Pepys on June 16. “It being now all over King’s Streete, at the Axe, and next door to it, and in other places.” At its height, in the last week of August 1665, the plague killed nearly 10,000 Londoners. “Thus this month ends with great sadness upon the publick, through the greatness of the plague every where through the kingdom almost,” wrote Pepys on August 31. “Every day sadder and sadder news of its encrease.”

The Great Fire of London, which began on September 2, 1666, and engulfed most of the central part of the city, helped quell the plague by killing the city’s disease-infected rats. As the fire raged toward his home, Pepys packed up his gold and silver and rode by cart in his nightshirt to a friend’s, safely outside the city. What he could not transport, he buried. Luck was on his side, however, and his neighborhood was spared.

As for the Lord of Sandwich, embezzlement was his downfall. While at war with the Dutch, Sandwich’s fleet captured several Dutch ships, including some loaded with goods from the East Indies. Instead of delivering these spoils of war to the King, Sandwich let the hatches be broken and divvied up the prizes with his fleet’s captains. His share’s worth came to 5,000 pounds. When news of this reached the King, Sandwich was stripped of his command. (He would later be reappointed and died in battle in 1672.)

Pepys’s assessment of the fall of “his Lord” is less forgiving. On December 31, 1665, he wrote: “The great evil of this year, and the only one indeed, is the fall of my Lord of Sandwich. The Duke of Albemarle goes with the Prince to sea this next year, and my Lord very meanly spoken of; and, indeed, his miscarriage about the prize goods is not to be excused, to suffer a company of rogues to go away with ten times as much as himself, and the blame of all to be deservedly laid upon him.”

Fearing for his eyesight, Pepys brought his diary to a close in 1669. He would later keep two other journals before his death in 1703, but Tomalin notes that they have “none of the qualities of the first Diary. Something essential was missing — some grit that had caused him to produce his pearl.” The luster of that pearl, and the qualities of the man, can be seen in the entry for Christmas day, December 25, 1666:

“To church in the morning, and there saw a wedding in the church, which I have not seen many a day; and the young people so merry one with another, and strange to see what delight we married people have to see these poor fools decoyed into our condition, every man and woman gazing and smiling at them. Here I saw again my beauty Lethulier. Thence to my Lord Bruncker’s by invitation and dined there, and so home to look over and settle my papers, both of my accounts private, and those of Tangier, which I have let go so long that it were impossible for any soul, had I died, to understand them, or ever come to any good end in them. I hope God will never suffer me to come to that disorder again.”

Observations from Samuel Pepys’s Diary On dog days:

“By coach to St. James’s and there did our business, which is mostly every day to complain of want of money.” (July 13, 1666)

On hard work: “How little merit do prevail in the world, but only favour; and for myself, chance without merit brought me in; and diligence only keeps me so, and will, living as I do among so many lazy people that the diligent man becomes necessary, that they cannot do anything without him.” (November 1, 1665)

On success: “But, Lord! to see what successe do, whether with or without reason, and making a man seem wise notwithstanding never so late demonstration of the profoundest folly in the world.” (August 15, 1666)

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